solarreviews:

The world’s largest solar-powered boat, Tûranor PlanetSolar, broke its own world record for crossing the Atlantic Ocean using only the power of the sun. The clean energy vessel traveled almost 2,870 miles in 22 days, 12 hours and 32 minutes.

Read the full article on the SolarReviews blog

(via emergentfutures)

wildcat2030:

Of all the vehicles Renault could’ve chosen to highlight its Formula 1 technology, it picked the Twizy, a glorified electric go-kart with the racing pedigree of, well, an electric go-kart. Yet we want to drive it. Desperately. We are not too proud to admit this.

The French automaker — which has won the F1 constructor’s and driver’s championships twice as a manufacturer and has provided engines to the likes of Red Bull Racing — inexplicably festooned the lowly Twizy with all manner of F1 frippery, including a front splitter, side pods and rear wing. All of this stuff is about as useful as your appendix, but no matter. It’s nothing we haven’t seen on Honda Civics for years. Ramping the absurdity up to 11, Renault Sport added tires and wheels from its Formula 2 cars and fitted the interior with a single carbon fiber race bucket and the button-laden steering wheel of a Formula Renault 3.5 series racer.

So why would we possibly want to drive it? KERS.

By adding the kinetic energy recovery system currently used on F1 cars, Renault has increased the power of the Twizy six-fold. (via We Desperately Want to Drive Renault’s Stupid F1 Tribute Car | Autopia | Wired.com)

WANTED: Astronauts for one-way trip to Mars

alexob:

image

A non-profit organization that aims to land four astronauts on Mars in 2023 has signed its first deal with a supplier for the ambitious space colonization effort. They are now starting their search for the astronauts that will live on Mars.

To apply for a position on Mars click here. 

(via wildcat2030)



Music piracy in the ’60s

Music piracy in the ’60s

(via emergentfutures)

1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what’s on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don’t just remember music easily, they can’t get it out of their minds, it’s so omnipresent.

4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.

5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind — the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.

6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can’t do, and to know where to go if they need help.

8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It’s an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians — anybody who deals with other people.

9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.

Howard Gardner’s seminal Theory of Multiple Intelligences, originally published in 1983, which revolutionized psychology and education by offering a more dimensional conception of intelligence than the narrow measures traditional standardized tests had long applied.  (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via wildcat2030)

wildcat2030:

Skyflash: Jetman-like wings designed to allow ground take off.

While most of us sit around grumbling and demanding to know, “where’s my jetpack?”, German Fritz Unger and a group of friends have decided to do something about it. On a shoestring budget they are building their own one-man, jet-propelled wing. Dubbed “Skyflash,” it’s meant to not only emulate the jet wing made famous by Jetman Yves Rossy, but to go one better by taking off from the ground instead of having to be dropped from an aircraft.

via: http://www.gizmag.com/skyflash-jet-propelled-wing/26355/

wildcat2030:

Smartphones are being integrated into each and every part of our daily lives, and with devices like the DoorBot hitting the market things are only becoming more integrated as time progresses.

This wireless video doorbell links to your smartphone, allowing visitors to ring your door bell at the front door causing your phone to ring. When your phone rings it will show up just as a normal call would, with the video camera showing you exactly who is at your front door. The battery operated device lasts up to one year on 4AA batteries, and connects to your iPhone via your WiFi internet connection. Worried about your DoorBot getting stolen? Don’t be. The team at DoorBot guarantees that they will replace your DoorBot if it is stolen. The best part is that thing will be integrated with Lockitron, allowing you to remotely allow visitors to get into the front door right from your smartphone or tablet. This is one of those projects you have to see in action to fully appreciate. (via DoorBot Wi-Fi Doorbell Camera for Smartphones | HiConsumption)

wildcat2030:

This concept for the iWatch by designer Pavel Simeonov is one of many cirulating on the web (Copyright: Pavel Simeonov)
We have gradually accepted more and more intrusive forms of technology. Is the smart watch the next logical step?
There’s nothing the internet likes more than rumours about Apple products – apart, possibly, from cute cats. In the last few days, it is the former that has preoccupied countless netizens.
Specifically, it was rumours about the possible appearance of an iWatch from the Cupertino tech giant. The frenzy of speculation was sparked by a piece written by interface expert and ex-Apple employee Bruce Tognazzini, who argued that a watch would “fill a gaping hole in the Apple ecosystem” and herald a new phase in how we interact with technology.
The article offered no proof that Apple was working on a watch – or that the device that was rapidly christened an iWatch was even a timekeeper (could iWatch be the name of the long awaited TV from Apple?). But the story – true or not – offers a fascinating insight into the rapidly emerging field of wearable computing.
For Tognazzini – the designer behind the Apple Mac’s original user interface – what’s at stake is computing that is able to treat you, for the first time, as a human being. Today, smartphones know roughly where we’re standing, the logins for a selection of our online profiles, and hold a selection of apps and files. Tomorrow, wearable computing might know everything from your altitude and posture to your pulse, blood type, height, weight, and daily routines, right down to the way you take coffee from different stores. (via BBC - Future - Technology - iWatch: Is it time for wearable computers?)

wildcat2030:

This concept for the iWatch by designer Pavel Simeonov is one of many cirulating on the web (Copyright: Pavel Simeonov)

We have gradually accepted more and more intrusive forms of technology. Is the smart watch the next logical step?

There’s nothing the internet likes more than rumours about Apple products – apart, possibly, from cute cats. In the last few days, it is the former that has preoccupied countless netizens.

Specifically, it was rumours about the possible appearance of an iWatch from the Cupertino tech giant. The frenzy of speculation was sparked by a piece written by interface expert and ex-Apple employee Bruce Tognazzini, who argued that a watch would “fill a gaping hole in the Apple ecosystem” and herald a new phase in how we interact with technology.

The article offered no proof that Apple was working on a watch – or that the device that was rapidly christened an iWatch was even a timekeeper (could iWatch be the name of the long awaited TV from Apple?). But the story – true or not – offers a fascinating insight into the rapidly emerging field of wearable computing.

For Tognazzini – the designer behind the Apple Mac’s original user interface – what’s at stake is computing that is able to treat you, for the first time, as a human being. Today, smartphones know roughly where we’re standing, the logins for a selection of our online profiles, and hold a selection of apps and files. Tomorrow, wearable computing might know everything from your altitude and posture to your pulse, blood type, height, weight, and daily routines, right down to the way you take coffee from different stores. (via BBC - Future - Technology - iWatch: Is it time for wearable computers?)

emergentfutures:


“Hybrid Wing” Uses Half the Fuel of a Standard Airplane
NASA has demonstrated a manufacturing breakthrough that will allow hybrid wing aircraft to be scaled up.
Full Story: MIT

emergentfutures:

“Hybrid Wing” Uses Half the Fuel of a Standard Airplane

NASA has demonstrated a manufacturing breakthrough that will allow hybrid wing aircraft to be scaled up.

Full Story: MIT